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ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES

WARNING:

Cigarette smoking increases the risk of serious side effects from oral contraceptives, including heart attacks, blood clots, and strokes. Women who are over 35 and who are heavy smokers are at a greater risk for these side effects. It is highly recommended that if you use oral contraceptive, you should not smoke.

USES:

This medication is used to prevent pregnancy. Estrogen and progestin are two female sex hormones and the combinations of these two hormones work by preventing the release of eggs from the ovaries and changing the cervical mucus and the lining of the uterus. Oral contraceptives are highly effective method of birth control; however they do not prevent the spread of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. Some oral contraceptive are also used to treat mild to moderate acne, and as an emergency contraceptive, however it is important to speak with your doctor before you try to use your birth control pills as an emergency contraceptive.

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HOW TO USE:

Oral contraceptives are taken once daily by mouth and come in packets of 21 or 28 tablets. Take this medication with food or milk to avoid upset stomach. To prevent missed doses take the tablet routinely at the same time every day. It is important to remember missing doses increases your risk of becoming pregnant. When starting this medication, it is important to use an additional method of birth control until you have correctly taken seven days’ of this medicine, to prevent the risk of pregnancy. If you have a 21-tablet packet, take one tablet daily until the pack is empty and then none for next seven days. After the seventh day start a new packet. If you have a 28-tablet packet, take one tablet daily. You should take one tablet daily continuously for 28 days in the order specified in your packet, starting a new packet the day after taking your 28th tablet. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully. Take the oral contraceptive exactly as directed by your physician. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Never stop taking any medication without first getting approval from your doctor. If you have recently given birth, wait until 4 weeks after giving birth to begin taking oral contraceptives. Follow your doctor’s directions exactly if this drug is being used as a “morning after” pill.

SIDE EFFECTS:

There are some common side effects associated with oral contraceptive, most do not need medical attention, however tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away symptoms such as: upset stomach, vomiting, stomach cramps or bloating, diarrhea, constipation, gingivitis (swelling of the gum tissue), weight gain or weight loss, brown or black skin patches, acne, swelling of the hands, feet, or lower legs (fluid retention), hair growth in unusual places, bleeding or spotting between menstrual periods, changes in menstrual flow, painful or missed periods, breast tenderness, enlargement, or discharge, or difficulty wearing contact lenses.

There is a possibility of some serious side effects; however they are rare, but if you experience any of them, call your doctor immediately. Symptoms such as: severe headache, shortness of breath, severe vomiting, partial or complete loss of vision, double vision, speech problems, dizziness or faintness, weakness or numbness of an arm or leg, crushing chest pain or chest heaviness, coughing up blood, calf pain, severe stomach pain, yellowing of the skin or eyes, severe depression, unusual bleeding, loss of appetite, extreme tiredness, weakness, or lack of energy, fever, dark-colored urine, light-colored stool, and rash. There is a possibility that oral contraceptives may increase the risk of developing endometrial and breast cancer, gallbladder disease, liver tumors, heart attack, stroke, and blood clots. Oral contraceptives may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

PRECAUTIONS:

Before taking oral contraceptives, tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to estrogen, progestin, or any other medications. It is important to always tell your doctor and pharmacist all of the prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, and nutritional supplements you are taking. Be sure to mention any of the following: acetaminophen; antibiotics; anticoagulants such as warfarin (Coumadin); atorvastatin (Lipitor); clofibrate (Atromid-S); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); griseofulvin (Fulvicin, Grifulvin, Grisactin); HIV protease inhibitors such as indinavir (Crixivan) and ritonavir (Norvir); medications for seizures such as carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton), phenytoin (Dilantin), and topiramate (Topamax); morphine (Kadian, MS Contin, MSIR, others); oral steroids such as dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexone), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisone (Deltasone), and prednisolone (Prelone); phenylbutazone; rifabutin (Mycobutin); rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); temazepam (Restoril); theophylline (Theobid, Theo-Dur); and thyroid medication such as levothyroxine (Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid). Before taking this medication, tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin), enalapril (Vasotec), and lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril); angiotensin II antagonists such as irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), and valsartan (Diovan); aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn); diuretics (‘water pills’) such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium); or heparin. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your other medications or monitor you carefully for side effects. Consult your doctor if you are taking any herbal products you are taking, especially St. John’s wort.

Remind your doctor if you have or have ever had breast lumps or cancer; endometrial cancer; high blood pressure; high blood cholesterol and fats; diabetes (high blood sugar); asthma; stroke; blood clots; toxemia (high blood pressure during pregnancy); heart attack; epilepsy (seizures); migraine headaches; depression; liver, heart, gallbladder, or kidney disease; adrenal insufficiency (for Yasmin); jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods; and excessive weight gain and fluid retention (bloating) during the menstrual cycle. Never take oral contraceptives if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking oral contraceptives, call your doctor immediately. Notify your doctor if you wear contact lenses, and also notify him or her if you notice changes in vision or ability to wear your lenses while taking hormone replacement therapy, see an eye doctor.

DRUG INTERACTIONS:

It is important to tell your doctor about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, or herbal products. Also let your doctor know if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Always get approval from your doctor before stopping or starting any of your medicines.

The following medications and substances may have an adverse affect with this medication: antibiotics or medicines for infections, especially rifampin, rifabutin, rifapentine, and griseofulvin; aprepitant, a medicine used for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; barbiturate medicines for producing sleep or treating seizures (convulsions); bosentan; carbamazepine; caffeine; clofibrate; cyclosporine; dantrolene; grapefruit juice; hydrocortisone; medicines for anxiety or sleeping problems, such as diazepam or temazepam; medicines for mental depression; medicines for diabetes, including troglitazone and pioglitazone; mineral oil; modafinil; mycophenolate; nefazodone; oxcarbazepine; phenytoin; prednisolone; ritonavir or other medicines for the treatment of the HIV virus or AIDS; selegiline; soy isoflavones supplements; St. John’s wort; tamoxifen or raloxifene; theophylline; topiramate; warfarin. This product can affect the results of certain lab tests (e.g., thyroid). Inform all laboratory personnel that you use this drug. Birth control pills may significantly intensify the effects of alcohol. Consult your doctor or pharmacist about this. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval.

OVERDOSE:

Contact your local emergency room or poison control center if an overdose is suspected. Symptoms of overdose may include nausea and vomiting. Females may experience vaginal bleeding.

NOTES:

It is vital to keep all appointments with your doctor. When using this medication you should have a complete physical examination every year, including blood pressure measurements, breast and pelvic exams and a Pap test. Follow your doctor’s directions for examining your breasts; report any lumps immediately. Remember to always inform the lab technicians that you take oral contraceptives before you have any laboratory tests, this medication may interfere with some laboratory tests.

In the event that you miss one menstrual period and have taken your tablets as directed, continue taking this medication as directed. If you miss one period and have not taken your tablets as directed or if you miss two menstrual periods and have taken the tablets as directed, this may be a sign of pregnancy and you should notify your doctor.
Consult your doctor if you wish to stop taking oral contraceptives and become pregnant, however you will still need to use another method of birth control for at least 3 months after you stop taking the tablets to be sure that the medication will not harm the fetus. It may be difficult or take a long time for you to become pregnant after you stop taking oral contraceptives. This is especially true if you have never had a baby or if you had irregular, infrequent, or complete absence of menstrual periods before taking oral contraceptives. Never let anyone else take any of your prescription medication.

MISSED DOSE:

Missing a dose of your oral contraceptive increases the risk of becoming pregnant. Instructions about missed doses are different for each type of oral contraceptive product. Carefully read the instructions in the manufacturer’s information for the patient. If you miss pills, you may need to use a backup method of birth control for 7 days or until the end of the cycle.

STORAGE:

Keep out of the reach of children. This medication should be store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C or 59 and 86 degrees F. Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any expired medication

IMPORTANT NOTE:

This information is not intended to replace the knowledge and skills of a qualified healthcare provider. While the following can be a valuable resource, this drug may not be safe or effective for everyone. You should always consult with a qualified healthcare provider before taking any prescription medication.